woman with hair loss from chemotherapy feeling weak and tired due to low hemoglobin

When a loved one is diagnosed with a terminal illness, discussions about end-of-life and palliative care often take center stage. These conversations can be difficult to have, but they are important in order to ensure that your loved one receives the best possible care. In this blog post, we will discuss some of the key things to keep in mind when talking about end-of-life and palliative care at home. We will also provide some helpful tips for caregivers who are navigating these difficult conversations.

 

What is Palliative care?

Palliative care is a type of healthcare that focuses on relieving the symptoms and stress of a serious illness. It is typically provided by a team of healthcare professionals, including doctors, nurses, social workers, and chaplains.

 

Palliative care can be provided at any stage of a serious illness and can be used alongside other treatments, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy. The goal of palliative care is to improve the quality of life for both the patient and their family.

 

Palliative care may include:

– Pain management

– Symptom control

– Emotional support

– Spiritual support

– Bereavement counseling

 

Palliative care is an important part of healthcare, but it is often misunderstood. Some people think that palliative care is only for terminal patients, or that it is a type of hospice care. However, palliative care can be provided to anyone with a serious illness, regardless of their prognosis.

 

What are the types of palliative care?

There are three main types of palliative care: curative palliative care, comfort-focused palliative care, and hospice palliative care. 

 

Curative

Curative palliative care focuses on treating the underlying cause of an illness in order to prolong life. Curative palliative care is often used in conjunction with traditional medical treatment, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy. It can be used at any stage of a serious illness, from diagnosis through treatment and into survivorship or end of life. Curative palliative care addresses the physical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs of the patient and their family.  

 

Comfort-Focused

Comfort-focused palliative care is also known as symptom management or palliative supportive care. It is focused on providing relief from the symptoms of a serious illness without necessarily treating the underlying cause of the illness. Comfort-focused palliative care can be used at any stage of a serious illness and can be provided alongside curative or hospice palliative care. 

 

Hospice

Hospice palliative care is focused on providing end-of-life care and support for both the patient and their family. Hospice palliative care can be used when a patient has been diagnosed with a terminal illness and their life expectancy is six months or less. Hospice palliative care focuses on comfort and quality of life rather than cure. It is provided by a team of interdisciplinary professionals who work together to meet the physical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs of the patient and their families. 

 

Palliative care is an important part of healthcare for people with serious illnesses. It can improve the quality of life for both the patient and their family. Palliative care is provided by a team of interdisciplinary professionals who work together to meet the physical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs of the patient and their families.

depressed cancer patient sitting up on hospital bed

Is palliative care better than prayer?

The answer to this question is not a simple one. While palliative care and prayer both offer support to those who are dealing with a serious illness, they each have their own unique benefits.

 

Palliative care focuses on providing comfort and relief from symptoms, while prayer can provide spiritual support and peace of mind. There is no right or wrong answer when it comes to deciding which is better for someone dealing with a serious illness. Ultimately, it is up to the individual to decide what works best for them.

 

Is Palliative care allowed in Christianity?

Palliative care is a branch of medicine that focuses on providing relief from the symptoms, pain, and stress of serious illness. The goal of palliative care is to improve the quality of life for both the patient and the patient’s family.

 

 Christians have long been at the forefront of providing palliative care, both through formal organizations such as hospices and informally through their support of family and friends who are terminally ill. In recent years, palliative care has become more mainstream, with an increasing number of hospitals offering palliative care services.

 

The Christian tradition affirms the dignity of all human life, from conception to natural death. Christians believe that every person is created in the image of God and is therefore deserving of dignity and respect. palliative care is one way in which Christians can put this belief into action, by providing comfort and support to those who are facing a serious illness.

 

While there is no explicit mention of palliative care in the Bible, there are numerous passages that affirm the importance of caring for the sick and those in need. For example, in Matthew 25:31-46, Jesus tells a parable about the judgment of the nations, in which those who cared for the sick and needy are welcomed into heaven while those who didn’t are condemned. This passage makes it clear that Christians are called to care for those who are suffering, regardless of whether they are able to cure their illness.

 

There are a variety of ways in which Christians can get involved in palliative care. Hospitals, nursing homes, and other health care facilities often have chaplains who provide spiritual support to patients and their families. Christian palliative care organizations such as hospices also rely heavily on volunteers to provide emotional and practical support to those who are terminally ill.

 

 Christians who are interested in getting involved in palliative care can also consider becoming certified palliative care nurses or doctors. Palliative care nurses receive specialized training in providing comfort and support to those who are seriously ill. Palliative care doctors receive additional training in pain management and symptom control.

 

Palliative care is an important part of the Christian tradition of caring for those who are suffering. Christians can get involved in palliative care by volunteering with organizations that provide support to the terminally ill, or by becoming certified palliative care nurses or doctors.

 

Is Palliative care allowed in Islam?

There is no one answer to this question as Islam is a religion with many different interpretations. Some Muslims believe that palliative care is allowed in cases where the goal is to relieve suffering, while others believe that it should only be used in cases where the patient is expected to recover. Ultimately, it is up to the individual Muslim and their religious leaders to decide whether palliative care is permissible in Islam.

 

Is Palliative care allowed in Judaism?

Yes, palliative care is allowed in Judaism. In fact, Jews have a long tradition of providing palliative care to those who are suffering. The Talmud, for example, contains several discussions on the subject of palliative care. Jewish law also recognizes the importance of relieving pain and suffering, and many rabbis have written about the ethical imperative to provide palliative care.

 

There is no one answer to the question of how much palliative care is required, as each situation is unique. However, Jewish tradition does emphasize the importance of compassion and mercy when caring for those who are suffering. As such, palliative care should be provided as needed, with the goal of relieving pain and suffering as much as possible.

 

Is Palliative care allowed in Hinduism?

Palliative care is based on the principle of ahimsa, which is the belief in non-violence. This means that palliative care should not cause any suffering or harm to the patient. Instead, its goal is to ease the pain and suffering of the patient by providing them with physical, emotional, and spiritual support.

 

There are many ways that palliative care can be provided, such as through massage, music therapy, and aromatherapy. Palliative care can also be provided by simply spending time with the patient and providing them with companionship and emotional support.

blue white pills medications left out of the prescription bottle

Is palliative care all about giving painkillers?

No, not always

Palliative care is not just about giving painkillers. It is a multidisciplinary approach to care that focuses on providing relief from the symptoms and stress of a serious illness. Palliative care can be provided alongside curative treatment, and it can be an important part of end-of-life care. Palliative care team members work with patients and their families to develop a plan of care that meets their unique needs and goals. This may include managing pain and other symptoms, providing emotional support, and helping with difficult decisions about treatment.

 

When should someone be offered palliative care support?

The answer to this question depends on the individual situation. In general, palliative care support should be offered when a person has a life-limiting illness and their condition is not expected to improve. Palliative care can be offered alongside curative treatment, or it may be the focus of care if curative treatment is no longer an option.

 

Palliative care team members work with the person and their family to identify what is important to them and what their goals are. This information is used to develop a care plan that meets the person’s needs and preferences. The palliative care team provides support for physical, emotional, social, and spiritual needs. They can also offer practical help and advice on managing symptoms and side effects.

 

Palliative care is an important part of end-of-life care. It can be provided in a variety of settings, including hospitals, hospices, community health services, and people’s homes. Palliative care team members work closely with other health professionals, such as GPs, nurses, and social workers, to ensure that the person receives the best possible care.

 

What kind of doctor provides palliative care?

Palliative care is a branch of medicine that focuses on providing relief from the symptoms and stress of serious illness. Palliative care doctors are trained in managing pain and other symptoms, as well as supporting patients and their families emotionally and spiritually. Many palliative care doctors are also trained in hospice care, which is palliative care specifically for patients who are terminally ill. Hospice care is provided by a team of specialists who work together to provide comprehensive care for the patient and family.

hospice support and gried counselling with the vios clinic for telemedicine support with palliative experts

Which family member should I talk to about palliative care?

There is no easy answer to this question, as it depends on each individual family’s dynamics and relationship with one another. However, in general, it is best to start the conversation with a close family member or friend with who you feel comfortable talking to about sensitive topics. This person can then help facilitate the conversation with other members of the family.

 

It is also important to keep in mind that palliative care is not just for end-of-life care; it can be helpful at any stage of a serious illness. So even if your loved one is not currently facing a life-threatening condition, palliative care can still be beneficial.

 

If you’re not sure who the best person to talk to would be, you can also consider reaching out to a palliative care team or hospice organization for guidance. They can provide support and resources to help you have this difficult but important conversation.

middle aged physician doctor preparing ehr notes from a telemedicine session

Can I get Palliative Support by telemedicine?

Palliative care can be provided through telemedicine, which means you can get palliative support even if you’re not able to see a doctor in person. There are many ways to get palliative care through telemedicine, including:

 

– Video conferencing: This can be used to connect you with a palliative care team who can provide support and information.

– Phone calls: You can talk to a palliative care team member by phone to get support and information.

– Email: You can email a palliative care team member to get support and information.

 

Getting palliative care through telemedicine can be a great way to get the support you need if you’re not able to see a doctor in person.

 

Does The VIOS Clinic provide remote palliative care support?

Yes, the VIOS Clinic provides remote palliative care support through telemedicine. This allows our patients to receive the care they need from the comfort of their own homes. Telemedicine palliative care is beneficial for those who have difficulty traveling to our clinic or who live in rural areas. It also allows our team to provide support to more people in a timely manner. 

 

The VIOS Clinic is proud to offer telemedicine palliative care to our patients. This service allows our patients to receive the care they need from the comfort of their own homes. Our team is able to provide support to more people in a timely manner, and we are committed to providing quality care to all of our patients. If you would like more information or if you would like to book an appointment with Dr. Charlene Shaw, MD to get a true empathic assessment of your loved one’s end-of-life care.

Dr. Charlene Shaw, MD

Palliative & Geriatric Specialist

Ismail Sayeed CEO Medical Director ViOS, Inc.

BLOG AUTHOR

Dr. Ismail Sayeed

Dr. Sayeed is the Medical Director of ViOS, Inc. He is a deeply committed physician entrepreneur & medical blog writer. While building the global infrastructure of the VIOS Clinic, he is dedicated to educate people on the potential of specialist telemedicine for managing chronic diseases.

Read more about him in his author bio

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